Can you answer these 5 questions about immunizations correctly?

We typically think of immunizations happening in early childhood, before a child reaches 11 or 12 years old. However, teens and adults need immunizations, too.

How well do you know the lifetime vaccine schedule? Test your skills below!

1. Should you get a flu shot this year?
Yes.
Correct! Adults and kids over six months of age need flu shots annually. Adults 65 years and older are at high risk for severe influenza and should ask for the high-dose flu shot which provides better protection in this age group.
No, I got one last year.
Wrong. Adults and kids over six months of age need flu shots annually.
I should only get one every 2-3 years.
Wrong. Adults and kids over six months of age need flu shots annually.
2.TRUE or FALSE: The Tdap protects against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis and lasts a lifetime.
False.
To be fair, this is a bit of a trick question. Tdap vaccine protects against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis. All adults should get at least one dose of Tdap, and a tetanus booster (Td) every 10 years.  Pregnant women should get a dose of Tdap preferably at 27-36 weeks of each pregnancy. 
False. The Tdap protects against tetanus, dog influenza and pneumonia.
Tdap vaccine protects against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis. All adults should get at least one dose of Tdap, and a tetanus booster (Td) every 10 years. Pregnant women should get a dose of Tdap, preferably at 27-36 weeks of each pregnancy. (Luckily, humans can’t catch dog influenza.)
True.
To be fair, this is a bit of a trick question. Tdap vaccine protects against tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis. All adults should get at least one dose of Tdap, and a tetanus booster (Td) every 10 years. Pregnant women should get a dose of Tdap preferably at 27-36 weeks of each pregnancy.
3. Who should get the HPV vaccine?
All children and some adults.
All children, regardless of sex or gender and regardless of sexual activity, should get the vaccine at age 11 or 12. The vaccination series is routinely recommended for adolescents at age 11 to 12 years, old but can be started as early as 9 years old. Vaccination is also recommended for females age 13 through 26 years and males age 13 through 21 years who were not adequately vaccinated when they were younger. Vaccination is also recommended for gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men, transgender people, and individuals with certain immuno-compromising conditions ages 22 through 26 years who were not adequately vaccinated when they were younger. The HPV vaccine helps prevent certain cancers and genital warts in both men and women.
Sexually active teenage girls only.
All children, regardless of sex or gender and regardless of sexual activity, should get the vaccine at age 11 or 12. The vaccination series is routinely recommended for adolescents at age 11 to 12 years old but can be started as early as 9 years old. Vaccination is also recommended for females age 13 through 26 years and males age 13 through 21 years who were not adequately vaccinated when they were younger. Vaccination is also recommended for gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men, transgender people, and individuals with certain immuno-compromising conditions (ages 22 through 26 years) who were not adequately vaccinated when they were younger. The HPV vaccine help prevent certain cancers and genital warts in both men and women.
Adults ages 19 and older only.
All children, regardless of sex or gender and regardless of sexual activity, should get the vaccine at age 11 or 12. The vaccination series is routinely recommended for adolescents at age 11 to 12 years old but can be started as early as 9 years old. Vaccination is also recommended for females age 13 through 26 years and males age 13 through 21 years who were not adequately vaccinated when they were younger. Vaccination is also recommended for gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men, transgender people, and individuals with certain immuno-compromising conditions ages 22 through 26 years who were not adequately vaccinated when they were younger. The HPV vaccine help prevent certain cancers and genital warts in both men and women.
4. Is it safe to get vaccinated during pregnancy?
Yes, but it depends on the type of vaccine.
Doctors recommend that pregnant women not get vaccines that use live, attenuated (weakened) viruses, such as the MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) and chicken pox vaccines. But they strongly recommend that moms-to be do get the flu (influenza) and Tdap (tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis) vaccines. Pregnant women are at increased risk for flu and pertussis, and vaccination can protect pregnant women and their babies from these diseases. Pregnant women should receive a Tdap vaccine at 27-36 weeks of each pregnancy and a flu shot during each pregnancy. Some women may also need other vaccines before, during, or after they become pregnant and should discuss this with their healthcare provider.
No. Pregnant women don’t need vaccines because they are naturally immune to disease.
Pregnant women are at increased risk for influenza and pertussis, and vaccination can protect pregnant women and their babies from these diseases. Pregnant women will need to receive a Tdap vaccine at 27-36 weeks of each pregnancy during their third trimester to protect themselves and their babies from whooping cough. Pregnant women should also and  receive a flu shot during each pregnancy. Some women may also need other vaccines before, during, or after they become pregnant and should discuss this with their healthcare provider.
No. Vaccines recommended for pregnant women can be dangerous for the developing fetus.
Both Tdap and flu vaccines have been carefully monitored for years and are safe for pregnant women and their babies. Decades of scientific research also strongly support that, in addition to being safe, Tdap and flu vaccines also help provide important disease protection.  It is recommended that pregnant women receive a Tdap vaccine during their third trimester to protect themselves and their babies from pertussis (whooping cough). Pregnant women should also receive the inactivated flu shot at any time during pregnancy to protect themselves and their baby from the flu.
5. TRUE or FALSE: Adults over 35 don’t need vaccines because humans are fully immune to diseases at this age.
False.
You got it! ! Adults need a seasonal flu shot annually. They should also get vaccinated for pertussis (whooping cough) if they have not previously received the Tdap vaccine and should get a tetanus and diphtheria booster every 10 years following the Tdap vaccine.  Other vaccines adults may need depending on their age and underlying health status include those that protect against pneumococcal pneumonia, shingles, human papillomavirus (which can cause certain cancers), meningococcal disease, hepatitis B, hepatitis A, chickenpox, measles, mumps, and rubella.
True.
Wrong! Adults need a tetanus booster every 10 years. Adults born after 1956 who haven’t received an MMR vaccine should get vaccinated to protect against measles, mumps and rubella. Other vaccines adults may need – depending on their age and underlying health status – include those that protect against pneumococcal pneumonia, shingles, human papillomavirus (which can cause certain cancers), meningococcal disease, hepatitis B, hepatitis A, and chickenpox.
Depends on your political affiliation.
Wrong! Adults need a tetanus booster every 10 years. Adults born after 1956 who haven’t received an MMR vaccine should also get vaccinated to protect against measles, mumps and rubella. Other vaccines adults may need – depending on their age and underlying health status – include those that protect against pneumococcal pneumonia, shingles, human papillomavirus (which can cause certain cancers), meningococcal disease, hepatitis B, hepatitis A, and chickenpox.

Now that you are a vaccine schedule expert, you’ll be excited to hear the latest news from Best Starts for Kids.

They just announced a partnership with the  University of Washington School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology and the Northwest Center for Public Health Practice.. As the awardee of the Best Starts Adolescent Immunization Learning Collaborative RFP, the University of Washington will work with the Public Health Seattle & King County Immunization Program to establish a learning collaborative aimed at increasing vaccination coverage rates for adolescents and teens, protecting them and others from serious infectious diseases. The project will seek to identify and address disparities in coverage while promoting the overall uptake in King County youth vaccination rates. This will be a quality improvement initiative, meaning it will employ evidence-based strategies and activities to drive improvements in the quality of health care. The total amount of the award is $600,000 over a three-year period. Learn more from UW’s announcement here.

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