SING-A-LONG: “These are a Few of Our Public Health Things”

Public Health is celebrating a long, productive year. Sing along! Click the links!  Smileys on restaurants and signage on clinics Saying “you’re welcome” to all who come in it Kicking off Best Starts with com-mun-ities These are a few 2017 things! Spray parks and hygiene and tales made of doodles Noro in oysters And phthalates […]

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QUIZ: Is your residence rat-proofed for the winter?

When it gets cold and rainy, we humans bundle up and retreat to the indoors. Unfortunately, so do rats. Besides being unsightly, rats spread bacteria and viruses, and they can cause damage to buildings, houses and even vehicles. So, before you settle in for the season, make sure you’ve done what you can to keep […]

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Medical Examiner’s Report: What we learned from those we lost in 2016

Last year, 14,373 people died in King County. The King County Medical Examiner’s Office (MEO) investigated those deaths that were sudden, unexpected or unnatural – 2,494* in total. But, the count of life lost is more than a number. By tracking and analyzing different manners of death as well as trends in homicides, traffic fatalities, […]

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‘Don’t stuff that turkey’ and other Thanksgiving food safety tips

Sure, Thanksgiving is a joyful time spent with family and friends, but if you’re like me and you’re cooking two turkeys, eight side dishes, three desserts and an entire appetizer spread, it can be stressful too. Plus, now that I work in public health, my guests expect that the food I prepare will not make […]

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Can you answer these 5 questions about immunizations correctly?

We typically think of immunizations happening in early childhood, before a child reaches 11 or 12 years old. However, teens and adults need immunizations, too. How well do you know the lifetime vaccine schedule? Test your skills below! Now that you are a vaccine schedule expert, you’ll be excited to hear the latest news from […]

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Community health advocate Q&A: Families, fish and the Duwamish Superfund site

Fish are a healthy component of many diets, but depending where fish spend their time, they can pick up contaminants like mercury or polychlorinated bipheyls (PCBs) in their bodies. These chemicals are introduced to the environment from industrial and historical uses and enter the food chain, accumulating in seafood, marine mammals and humans. We talked with Mai Hoang, a Vietnamese-speaking Community Health Advocate who is working with Public Health – Seattle and King County.  She shared with us what drives her work as well as some of the challenges she encounters in sharing this information with her community.

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