Adorable animals: Shameless pandering for emergency preparedness

We know you aren’t as prepared for an emergency as you could be. Don’t feel badly–it’s true for everyone, and even though we are the health department, we’re not going to wag our finger. But we aren’t above wagging some tails.(Go ahead and groan.)

We’re here to help encourage you to take those next steps to be a little more prepared, so let’s make this a little more appealing with baby animals.

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Store water. This adorable bulldog has the right idea–you can reuse plastic bottles. Clean and fill 2-liter bottles and mark the date with Sharpie (refresh the water every 6 months).
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Make a family evacuation plan. Practice evacuating the house in case of fires or floods. Plan where you will meet if you are separated during a disaster and how you’ll  contact each other.
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Get to know your neighbors. In big emergencies, emergency workers and government services will be stretched thin. Communities where people help each other are the ones that recover quickest.
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If you feel an earthquake: drop, cover and hold under a table or desk! These canines are doing it in style–and protecting themselves from falling objects and toppling furniture, the main cause of injury. What if there’s no table? Make sure your head is not the highest object in the room–get low and beside heavy furniture, like a sofa, or sit beside an inside wall and cover your head with your arms.
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Did you remember to get supplies for your pet? Store some extra food, kitty litter, and water for your little buddy, and include your vet’s number in your emergency contact list. Learn more about emergency preparedness for your pet.
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If you’ve taken a few new steps to be more ready for emergencies, congratulations! Go ahead and feel smug. You’ve earned a little peace of mind.

All emergencies can impact your health, whether it’s severe weather, a flood, or an earthquake. For more on the hazards in our area and getting ready, check out our emergency preparedness site.

 

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I am a risk communications specialist at Public Health - Seattle & King County.