A tour of Public Health in action: LIVE from Public Health Week

What are the many ways Public Health touches your life? For Public Health Week,  we took to the streets to learn how public health professionals are working to promote health across King County. From restaurant inspectors to school-based health providers to STD experts, our staff went live on Facebook to show us how they get […]

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Communities of Opportunity expands investments to increase civic engagement and strengthen connections

Communities of Opportunity, a partnership that includes Public Health – Seattle & King County, is expanding efforts to help neighborhoods and cultural communities contribute to better health, safe and affordable housing, economic opportunity and stronger community connections for residents. The approach focuses on sharing power and decision-making with community partners, supporting community-led solutions and working […]

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Best Starts for Kids: Ensuring Health and Safety for All Children in Child Care

Child care centers are busy places. Caring for children of all ages includes many schedules, curriculum, food preparation, naps, comforting tears, and not least of all, working hard to provide a safe and healthy child care environment. But did you know that child care staff often have a nurse to call upon to help coach them on how to promote healthy practices?

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“U-Dub” and Public Health – Seattle & King County team up with new alliance for healthier communities

As our community’s top public health strategist, Public Health – Seattle & King County uses science and best practices to improve and promote health county-wide. We hire some of the best trained experts and generate research that makes a real difference, like having one of the world’s best survival rates from cardiac arrest. At the […]

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Community health advocate Q&A: Families, fish and the Duwamish Superfund site

Fish are a healthy component of many diets, but depending where fish spend their time, they can pick up contaminants like mercury or polychlorinated bipheyls (PCBs) in their bodies. These chemicals are introduced to the environment from industrial and historical uses and enter the food chain, accumulating in seafood, marine mammals and humans. We talked with Mai Hoang, a Vietnamese-speaking Community Health Advocate who is working with Public Health – Seattle and King County.  She shared with us what drives her work as well as some of the challenges she encounters in sharing this information with her community.

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