Mental Health Resources For Essential Workers

Essential and frontline workers and emergency responders have been involved in the COVID-19 response for many months now. While this work is rewarding, the long hours, breadth of demands, and exposure to human suffering can adversely affect the most seasoned responder. As we transition into the autumn and prepare for both the seasonal flu and the mental health crisis that experts are warning is ahead, this already difficult work may become more so.

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A Conversation on Hope and Hopelessness

Adjusting to the changes COVID-19 has imposed has been very difficult for everyone. We talked with Diana Cortez Yanez, a King County resident who has lived with depression and found hope. She shares about her journey through feelings of despair and loneliness, reaching out for support, and the tools that helped her navigate this time.

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Leading with Racial Justice in King County

On June 11, 2020, King County Executive, Dow Constantine, and Public Health Director, Patty Hayes, declared racism is a public health crisis. Since the declaration, in partnership with system advocates, community members, and public servants throughout King County government, Executive Constantine put together a package of proposals that reforms the criminal legal system, and funds ongoing work to confront racism as a public health crisis.

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September marks National Recovery Month: How to support friends and family in recovery

September marks National Recovery Month, a time to acknowledge the gains made by those in recovery who have faced challenges from mental health or substance use disorders. Many of us have faced these challenges ourselves or know a close friend or family member who has. This year poses even more challenges, from COVID-19 to wildfire […]

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Bridging the Gap Between Community and Systems

Willard Jimerson, Jr. grew up in Seattle’s historically African American Central District neighborhood. Raised by a loving grandmother and grandfather, young Will could never have predicted that just six weeks after his 13th birthday he’d become a ward of the state and spend the rest of his childhood in America’s adult prison system.

One fatal and catastrophic moment on a late night in 1994 changed everything. The kid who once fancied himself a charming and mischievous prankster, who loved playing arcade games and pick-up football, was gone.

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